How a Broken Leg Sells Merchandise

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After this past weekend’s horrendous broken leg suffered by the Louisville Cardinals’ Kevin Ware, which took place live during a national broadcast of the Cardinals’ NCAA Elite 8 game, Louisville has come out with a series of Adidas jerseys (shown above) that seemingly honor Ware and use his injury as a way to motivate fans. As reported on the website Yardbarker, there is no indication that the proceeds will go to help Ware with medical bills or toward any other special cause. However, as the website points out, there are strict rules that forbid a NCAA player from profiting from his play.

The university has since responded to criticism of selling the jerseys by saying that special royalty fees were waived and that proceeds would go toward a special scholarship fund. A university spokesperson would not elaborate on the purpose of the scholarship or to whom it would be directed. What do you think about this?

Thanks to Ian Lueninghoener for the tip.

Sources: Yardbarker.com, University of Louisville

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5 thoughts on “How a Broken Leg Sells Merchandise

  1. ball1329 says:

    each shirt is also $24.99. Hooray capitalism

  2. Jeffrey Maciejewski says:

    What a deal! I wonder exactly how much of the proceeds will be going to the special scholarship fund …

  3. Wow that is… awful.
    Also a horribly designed shirt, just saying.
    Though if they really are going to a scholarship, as opposed to pue profits that does make it a little better. I’d really prefer the money to go to the kid though – either as medical bills or as a scholarship for him since he’s likely to lose his next year. :/

  4. ball1329 says:

    As of today, the shirts have been taken off the market because, and I quote, “Schools aren’t allowed to sell merchandise that references a specific player.” Which is funny, because there is this kid at Creighton who wears No. 3 on the basketball team, and they sell this little ditty. bit.ly/12rf2ia Kind of odd.

  5. Jeffrey Maciejewski says:

    Yes, odd. I’d like to get a copy of that rule!

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